11169 – AN EXQUISITE CABINET ON STAND DECORATED WITH HAND-MADE PAPER FILIGREE AND SET WITH OVAL HAIRWORK PANELS

11169 AN EXQUISITE CABINET ON STAND DECORATED WITH HAND-MADE PAPER FILIGREE AND SET WITH OVAL HAIRWORK PANELS, DECORATED BY MARY ANNE HARVEY BONNELL OF PELLING PLACE, BERKSHIRE English. Completed Circa 1789. Measurements: Height: 41 1/2″ (105.4 cm) Width: 23″ (58.4 cm) Depth: 15 1/2″ (39.4 cm).



Research
Of deal substrate, paper filigree and hair work.  Lid with lock centered by circular colored engraving, rising to reveal a paper-lined well. Meandering floral pattern at the top of the front and sides in paper filigree. Filigree decorated double doors at front, each with keyholes and a central ovoid hair-work panel, that open to reveal an interior with single shelf, sides decorated with swags.  The whole of the stand with elaborate paper filigree decoration of a floral and naturalistic design, guilloché detailing around its top edge and the serpentine front with swags.  The whole raised on four tapering legs.

Marks:
Label on inside door reads:
worked in 1789

Provenance:
Pelling Place, Old Windsor, Berkshire
Then by descent,
Grosvenor House Antiques Fair 1986, Edric van Vredenburgh
Florian Papp, New York

Published:
Grosvenor House Antiques Fair Handbook, 1986
Papp, Melinda F, and William J. Papp. Rolled, Scrolled, Crimped and Folded: The Lost Art of Filigree Paperwork. New York, 1988.
Reif, Rita. “PAPER FILIGREE: AN ART FOR LEISURE.” The New York Times. The New York Times, 07 May 1988.
Riley, Noël. The Accomplished Lady – A History Of Genteel Pursuits c. 1660-1860. Wetherby, Oblong Creative Ltd, 2017.

This cabinet is a fine example of late eighteenth century cabinetwork, but perhaps more importantly, it is one of only a group of six known pieces of full-sized furniture decorated with paper filigree or ‘quilling’ to have survived. The piece was originally placed in Pelling Place in Old Windsor, home to Mary Anne Harvey Bonnell (1763-1853) who appears to have been one of the most consummate exponents of artistic, so-called eighteenth century “ladies’ pastimes,” which included paper filigree, shellwork, embroidery, painted textiles, silhouette-making and decoupage.

Full research report available.


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