9876 – A MAGNIFICENT MONUMENTAL ALABASTER VASE WITH FINE ETRUSCAN RED AND BLACK PAINTED DECORATION

9876 A MAGNIFICENT MONUMENTAL ALABASTER VASE WITH FINE ETRUSCAN RED AND BLACK PAINTED DECORATION Probably Rome. Early 19th Century.   Measurements: Height: 51″ (129.5cm) Width: 28 1/2″ (72.4cm)



Research
Of white alabaster. The volute krater form with extensive red and black Etruscan painted decoration including classically robed figures within a temple, gorgon masks, Greek key and anthemion motifs. Old refreshment to paint work. Repair to old crack.

Provenance:
The collection of the late Marco Gobi, Rome.
The collection of Daniel Katz, the Etruscan dining room, Lansdowne Walk, London.

This painted vase is modeled after Apulian volute kraters from the ancient world, large vessels used for diluting wine with water in Greek symposia. The volute is the largest of all the types of kraters, named for its handles, which extend vertically from the vessel’s shoulder and resemble the scrolled volutes of a column’s capital. From the 8th century BC onwards, the Greek colony of Taras in the southeast Italian region of Apulia (or Puglia) was a major production center for pottery, and particularly of black-figure and red-figure works. Another technique was white-ground vase painting, a variation of red-figure painting that flourished in the late 6th and 5th centuries BC, used particularly for funerary purposes. It was most popular in Athens and came closest to imitating the wall paintings of Pompeii.

Full research report available.


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