9256

AN EXTREMELY RARE PAIR OF GEORGE III LACQUER AND TÔLE PEINTE CENTER TABLES

Pontypool. Last Quarter Of The 18th Century.

Measurements

Height: 26" (66cm)
Width of Top Straight Across: 27 1/2" (70cm)
Maximum Width of Top on the Diagonal: 32" (81cm)

Research
Of tôle peinte and lacquer. Each with an octagonal painted tôle tilt-top with pierced edge, the center decorated with a floral spray, the top raised on a lacquered baluster stem and three cabriole legs with pad feet, the legs and feet with floral decoration. Minor differences in interpretation of each wooden base but both of a very similar date. Old touch ins to one top.

This rare pair of tables is a striking example of Pontypool lacquered tôle, one the eighteenth century’s most innovative decorative techniques. A closely comparable table in the collection at Colonial Williamsburg, dated to 1765 and with a rectangular top (figure 1), shares the same hand-punched pierced edging and eared corners of the present pair and is decorated with fruit and flowers in a style and composition closely related to that of these pieces. In addition, both the present pair and the Williamsburg table are raised on a lacquered baluster stem with three cabriole legs with pad feet.1

Pontypool lacquered tôle, named after its place of manufacture in south Wales, was famed for its exceptionally high luster. First developed by the ‘projecting genius’ Thomas Algood in the 1690’s, the technique involved the application of a linseed based oil to which could be added various pigments followed by high and precise firing. The results were very durable and bore exceptionally lustrous decoration in a variety of brilliant colors, exemplified in the decoration of present tables.2

Full research report available on request.

Full research report available on request.