11232

A LARGE PAIR OF WHITE OPALINE GLASS AND POLYCHROME ENAMEL VASES IN THE ‘ETRUSCAN’ STYLE

Probably St. Petersburg. Circa 1840.

Measurements

Height: 25" (63.5 cm)
Diameter: 9" (23 cm).

Research
Of white opaline glass and colored enamels. The ovoid body mounted by a flared neck and supported by a socle resting on a square plinth. The neck and foot of each vase decorated with registers of greek key and other geometric designs, the shoulder decorated with alternating anthemion and lozenge motifs, and the body of each  decorated with different vignettes depicting classical male and female musicians and dancers.

Provenance:
A South Of England UK Collection

The glass industry in Russia during the nineteenth century was characterized by technological innovation and rapid expansion. The import of foreign glass was banned,1 and therefore the establishment of domestic glassworks was encouraged. The Imperial Glass Factory at St. Petersburg, officially founded as a state factory in 1792, was the leading workshop in Russia, producing “art pieces to be presented to the Imperial Court or to be granted to private individuals and institutions on behalf of the Monarch from His Majesty’s Cabinet.”2 It was unrivaled in the production of colored glass both in Russia and throughout Europe.

The extensive manufacture of colored glass accompanied an interest in revival styles (historicism) as well as exotic cultures, and a range of forms and decorative motifs covering a variety of periods and fashions were produced, including Islamic, Gothic, Etruscan, and Chinoiserie. The use of opal glass, also referred to as “milk” or “bone glass,” was particularly employed in these instances. The painting of glass was executed under the supervision of Pytor Neupokoyev, master of ‘painting and making up chemical paints,’ as well as the painter Vasily Solodovnikov and his eight apprentices. The decoration of glass objects came from a variety of sources; “an inventory of the painting workshop in 1792 lists a large number of French prints from ‘Herculaneum’ books (i.e., publications of wall paintings found during the excavations of Pompeii and Herculaneum) and other works devoted to similar subjects.”3

Full research report available on request.

Full research report available on request.