11724

A MOST UNUSUAL, FINELY CARVED AND NATURALISTICALLY PAINTED MIRROR IN THE FORM OF A CLASSICAL RUIN BY JOHANN GROSSMANN

Interlaken, Switzerland. Nineteenth Century.

Measurements

Height: 28” (71.1 cm); Width: 21” (53.3 cm); Depth: 4 ¼” (10.7 cm).

Research
Of carved and polychrome painted wood. The replaced rectangular mirror plate surrounded by a carved frame in the form of classical ruins with frieze and architrave supported on either side by Corinthian columns, and raised on a breakfront plinth base. Two palm trees stand on the left, with vines and vegetation applied throughout. 

Marks:
Stamped to the top:
J. GROSSMANN
Incised XI on reverse 

Provenance:
Wright Saltus Ludington, at his Palladian Villa Hesperides, Santa Barbara.

This mirror belongs to a small group of related pieces by the Swiss master sculptor Johann Grossmann, who established his manufactory in 1831 in Interlaken near Bern, Switzerland. The region, which also included the villages of Ringgenberg and Brienz, was home to a “long, well-cultivated tradition and its outstanding, well-known wood carvers. An impressive series of Brienz carvers presented their works over two centuries at important exhibitions in Europe and overseas.”1 Johann Grossmann exhibited wood carvings at the Exposition International in Vienna in 1873, and at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia in 1876. 

Full research report available on request. 

 

Full research report available on request.