11186

A PAIR OF CARVED BEECHWOOD FOOTSTOOLS CLOSELY MODELED ON AN EGYPTIAN TWENTY-SIXTH DYNASTY EXAMPLE

Probably French. Nineteenth Century.

Measurements

Height: 11 3/4" (29.8 cm); Width: 18" (45.7 cm); Depth:19 3/4" (50.8 cm).

Research
Of stained beechwood. Each with rectangular top plaited replaced leather straps, the front legs with carved lion heads continuing into paws, the back legs with entwined tails, all raised on tapering gilt block feet.

Provenance:
Private collection, New York.

This pair of stools takes as its direct prototype an ancient Egyptian footstool from the Late Period (664-332 BC), in the collection of the Musée du Louvre (Inventory number E 10780) (figure 1). The Louvre example is of very nearly identical dimensions (Height: 28.5 cm; Depth: 51.5 cm) and is located today in the Sully Wing, Salle 8. The piece dates from the 26th Dynasty, also called Saïte period (relating to the period when the Pharaohs ruled at Saïs), and entered the Louvre collection in the 1899 via the antiquarian and antiquities dealer Mihram Sivadjian, having formerly belonged to the family of French diplomat Ferdinand Marie, Vicomte de Lesseps. Lesseps served as vice-consul to Tunis, and consul to Cairo and Alexandria in the 1830s, where he befriended Said Pasha, son of the viceroy. After his retirement from diplomatic service, he returned to Egypt when Said Pasha became viceroy in 1854, and was given permission to initiate and oversee the development of the Suez Canal. Ferdinand’s father had also spent time in Egypt before his son, and knew Bernardino Drovetti, French Consul General to Egypt, who had an important collection of Egyptian objects, some of which were also acquired by the Louvre. By the 1930s the stool was exhibited in the Antiquities department in a room showcasing funeral furniture.

Full research report available on request.

Full research report available on request.