9081

A RARE LECTUS FORM PAINTED DAY BED IN THE MANNER OF H. E. FREUND

Possibly Copenhagen. Second Quarter Of The 19th Century.

Measurements

Width: 79 1/2" (202cm)
Depth: 29 1/2" (75cm)

Research

Of white and polychrome painted wood. The slatted bed terminating in a scroll at the head, the shaped sides painted with lions, the frieze decorated with an anthemion pattern, the whole raised on four tapering fluted legs, each headed with a rectangular capital and terminating in a hooved foot. Each pair of legs joined by a painted stretcher.

This day bed was executed in the second quarter of the nineteenth century during what is considered the Danish Golden Age, a period of exceptional creativity and development of the neoclassical style in which a more pure interpretation of ancient prototypes was developed. “Not until the end of the 18th century did the influence from the excavations in the ancient cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii generally make themselves felt, partly thanks to the many illustrated accounts of the excavations.”1

The earliest known piece of ‘neo-antique’ Danish furniture is a mahogany klismos chair by the artist and designer Nicolai Abraham Abildgaard (1743-1809). Abildgaard was primarily a painter, but he also occupied himself with sculpture, architecture, and interior and furniture design. Like the French painter Jacques-Louis David he aimed to recreate ancient Greek furniture based on pieces illustrated in vase painting.

Full research report available on request.

Full research report available on request.