9060

AN IMPOSING PAIR OF REGENCY MAHOGANY SEMI-ELLIPTICAL CONSOLE TABLES WITH ALABASTRO FIORITO TOPS

English. Early Nineteenth Century.

Measurements

Height: 37" (94cm)
Width: 48 1/2" (123cm)
Depth: 19 1/2" (50cm)

Research

Of mahogany. Each with semi-elliptical, veneered alabastro fiorito top above a conforming plain frieze, the top raised on a boldly carved winged lion monopodium terminating in a paw foot and two square posts to the rear, the whole raised on a conforming plinth base.

Provenance:
Egremont House, 94 Piccadilly, London.
Until the 1998, property of the Naval and Military Club, Piccadilly.

This impressive pair of tables formerly stood in the grand Palladian mansion at 94 Piccadilly, London, originally known as Egremont House (figure 1).

The house was built in 1761 for Charles Wyndham, 2nd Earl of Egremont by the architect Matthew Brettingham, one of the best-known champions of Palladianism in England, responsible for such impressive country- and townhouses as Norfolk House in St. James’ Square and Kedleston Hall, Derbyshire. For a century the house changed ownership several times. By the 1820s the property had passed into the hands of the Marquess of Cholmondeley, during which time it was known as Cholmondeley House. He was followed by the Duke of Cambridge for whom it was designated Cambridge House, a name which endures to this day, and finally by Lord Palmerston who lived there until his death in 1865.

Shortly thereafter, 94 Piccadilly was acquired by the Naval and Military Club, a gentlemen’s club for officers formed in 1862. It came to be nicknamed the “In and Out Club,” for the conspicuous signposts of its entrance and exit gates. Gentlemen’s clubs in London offered upper class men private spaces in which to socialize, removed from domestic and public stresses. Over 30 clubs, each with its own distinguishing identity, occupied the neighborhood surrounding Pall Mall, St. James’s and Piccadilly.

Figure 2 depicts one of the tables in situ in the Octagon Room of the Naval and Military Club, circa 1991.

Full research report available on request.

Full research report available on request.