7013

AUBUSSON CARPET DESIGNED BY EUGENE VIOLLET-LE-DUC FOR NOTRE DAME DE PARIS

French. Circa 1860.

Measurements

Length: 20' (6 m)
Width: 15' (4.59m)

Research

Of flat woven wool. The whole centered by a temple of Islamic design issuing a profusion of stylized foliate tendrils against a red ground and edged with a border decorated with a repeat acanthus pattern.

The design of the present carpet was the work of Eugène Viollet-le-Duc (1814-1879) for the sanctuary of Notre Dame de Paris in the 1860s.

Viollet-le-Duc was a highly talented and individualistic architect and designer, as well as being an eminent art historian. Despite an early passion for architecture, he refused to enter the École des Beaux-Arts, choosing instead the experience of working with practicing architects and traveling France and Italy to view great works from the past. Viollet-le-Duc was part of an international group of theorists who imbued ornament with a new importance and his Entretiens sur l’architecture (1858) was  cited by Victor Horta and Gaudí as an influence on their theories of architecture.

Although he was generally hailed in his time, Viollet-le-Duc did have his detractors, such as the sculptor August Rodin, who felt his artistic interventions too extreme. Nevertheless, his accomplishment and subsequent fame led to his most notable other commissions, for the rebuilding and furnishing of the Imperial residence of Château de Pierrefonds (1857–70) for Napoleon III, and for the restoration of Château d’Eu for the Orléans family (1862-79).1

Full research report available on request.

Full research report available on request.