8043

THE GIEBELSTADT TABLES – AN IMPOSING PAIR OF LATE BAROQUE GILTWOOD CONSOLE TABLES BEARING THEIR ORIGINAL FINE WÜRZBURGER GOLDBANK MARBLE TOPS

Bamberg. Circa 1720.

Measurements

Height: 32" (81.5 cm)
Width: 43" (109.5 cm)
Depth: 28" (71 cm)

Research
Of giltwood with fine molded fossiliferous reef limestone (Würzburer Goldbank) top. Each with shaped marble top with molded edge and shaped undermold above a stepped and molded frieze raised on four scrolling uprights, each upright of undulating molded form with raised edging to the sides, set with acanthus carving to the top issuing trailing foliate carving, each upright issuing a scrolling foliate stretcher meeting at a restored central circular reserve supporting a molded dish, each upright terminating in a block foot with foliate carving.

Provenance:
Latterly at Stammschloss, Giebelstadt near Würzburg

The present tables are closely related to a console table which formed part of the original furnishings of Schloss Seehof, northern Bavaria, and which, according to correspondence from Dr. Alfred Schelter of Schloss Seehof,1 was probably made by the Bamberg based court furniture maker Servatius Brickard (1676-1742) in 1722 (figure 1). Originally from Brabant he moved to Bamberg in 1705 in ‘the service of Prince-Bishop Lothar Franz Von Schönbrun’ and in 1735 he was created Hofschreiner (cabinet maker to the court).

Both the Seehof table and the present pair are clearly infused with the same principles of design. The compact proportions of both are similar, as is the use of a distinctive compressed carved foot issuing from a scroll. Moreover, the tables also share a similarly flowing scrolling x-stretcher which unite to form a plateau while the legs on both are of restrained cabriole form.

The rare fossiliferous reef limestone tops are nearly identical in marking and coloration on all three tables and must have been cut from the same seam. This uncommon stone is known as “Würzburger Goldbank” and is mined locally.* Furthermore, both the top of the Seehof table and those of the present pieces have particularly fine beak molded edges and exaggeratedly overhanging tops, especially found in furniture made for the Prince-Bishops of Franconia. For example, a number of other tables with this same feature can be viewed in the entrance gallery of the Würzburg Residenz. With the above in mind, it seems possible that the present tables were also commissioned from Brickard for Seehof.

Full research report available on request.

Full research report available on request.